Tuesday, March 26, 2019

The Four Don'ts of the 2020 Democratic Campaign

Whoever the Democratic nominee is going to be in 2020, that nominee has to avoid unforced errors to maximize their chances of beating Trump. Besides never letting the word "deplorables" pass their lips, here are four things the nominee should avoid advocating because they are unpopular and/or borrow a world of political trouble.
1. Reparations for the descendants of slaves. Preferred: social programs that disproportionately benefit blacks because of their income, education or geographic attributes.
2. Abolish ICE. Preferred: Reforming ICE + a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants + an actual immigration policy that includes border security and policies about future immigration levels.
3. Medicare for All that eliminates private insurance. Preferred: Medicare for Anyone or Medicare for All (Who Want It). Currently embodied in the DeLauro-Schakowsky Medicare for America bill.
4. A Green New Deal that commits to 100 percent renewable energy within 10 years. Preferred: A Green New Deal that focuses on jobs, infrastructure and research.
The preferred policies would of course still be very progressive. And they'd allow the Democrats to win the election too, unlike the four don'ts. Seems like an easy call to me.

2 comments:

  1. Despite your wise warnings it seems that Democratic messaging has a hard time finding its mark. It is more defined by Trump and the GOP than by Democrats. In fact, that is the problem. There is no unified message. There is a core, which is what they should focus on and not scare the middle away. There's plenty of time for dreaming progressive after you've won.

    As we plod toward 2020 there is a mine field of Democratic blunders which candidates need to avoid as your warnings indicate. Unfortunately, most have already stepped on them. No one seems to be in charge of messaging.

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  2. Calling for abolishing ICE will make the Democrats look weak. Medicare for All will be exploited be Republicans as bankrupting a program that faces financial problems in the future.

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